Wednesday, 13 February 2013

How to cook


As my regular reader will have gathered from the recent entry under 'M' in the Shitipedia, I am not much of an admirer of Microsoft. In fact, one of the best decisions I ever took was to dump Windows and buy an Apple - albeit that I still lumbered with their damned Office suite. Mind you, it falls over less often and runs quicker.

Anyway, imagine my unbridled delight when I read in the Independent (before you comment, they gave me free copy on the plane) that Microsoft's former Chief Technology Officer, Nathan Myhrvoid (great name!) has written a cook book. But not, of course, just any old cook book. Oh, no!

Modernist Cuisine is a six volume 2,438 page monster of a cook book expounding the techniques, equipment and ingredients you simply ought to have to be a Modernist (note the capitalisation) in the world of gastronomy.

Apparently, he compares Modernists in the field of cooking to be like the Modernists that showed the way in the art world. Pretentious? Mois? Mais non!

Now not content to write voluminous tomes to sell to people with more money than common sense, he has produced a more modest follow up entitles "Modernist Cuisine at Home" aimed at us mere mortals who aspire to reach his God-like gastronomic heights.

After all, not all of us can claim to own a sous-vide machine or a Paco-jet - or indeed even have a kitchen big enough to house all this shit!

This new book does, however, solve one problem that has always been a problem for me in my kitchen so I am eternally grateful for the section that demonstrates to us budding Modernists how to make our very own "perfectly melting cheese slice". Apparently I have been going wrong all these years by assuming that you :

  1. place slice of bread under grill
  2. remove and apply slice of cheese to untoasted side
  3. place back under grill and watch it melt.
Apparently this is not the way to do it all, but if you want to know the correct way, then I'm afraid you'll have to buy the book...

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

I've always used the simple rule "When it's brown it's down, If it's black it's buggered" I've had no problems